Goodwood Revival

This is what it’s like when someone who can actually write in english pens an article for you.  Ben Koflach from Performance BMW was kind enough to send us his photos and words for last weekends Goodwood Revival in th UK.  Thanks for the photos Ben!!  You’ll be seeing some more PBMW related stuff here soon 😉  For the full album, click here.  But please do take the time to read.  🙂

Many events claim to be unique – not many are. The Revival at Goodwood in the UK is different, however. Run by devoted petrolhead Lord March, the annual event sees people flock in their thousands to his Sussex estate, which happens to feature a hillclimb circuit (otherwise used as the driveway) and a race circuit within its borders.

Where else in the world can you experience a step back in time and a petrolhead’s dream all in one place? Unlike the also annual hillclimb-based Festival of Speed, which is based around the hillclimb, the circuit-based Revival celebrates purely the racing, fashions and way of life of the ‘40s, ‘50s and ‘60s.
If you’re not going to turn up in appropriate dress, you may as well not turn up – those choosing not to wear period clothing look out of place. Those that make the effort go a long way towards making the event what it is – a celebration of the good old days.

This year’s event was fully sold-out – you can only get to the Revival if you book your ticket before-hand, and numbers are capped. This year that meant 146,000 people visited in its three days of opening. This included those that camped and so stayed all three days.
Just because many of the cars are priceless pieces of automotive art, don’t think they’re all driven around in some sort of procession-style manner. Oh no, these classics are all driven just as hard as they would have been back in the day. That includes a number of Ferrari 250 GTOs, each of which is worth more than an average suburb – up to $35 million USD a piece in fact. Lightweight E-Type Jaguars, 50s saloons and ex-F1 single-seaters also feature, along with historic motorcycles. There were quite a few pricey looking crashes over the weekend too – a sign that none of the drivers are holding back. Several of which, as it happens, were current and ex-professional race drivers, including Anthony Reid and ex-F1 driver Martin Brundle.
The weather on our Friday visit started off a little grey and rainy, but luckily it sooned turned into a beautiful day. The track dried out, and despite being mainly practice sessions, the action was fantastic – several near-misses again confirming that all of the drivers meant business. One of the most spectacular cars to watch was undoubtedly the leading mk2 Jaguar in the 50s saloons category, which had tyre smoke pouring off its rear tyres round almost every corner, and proved to be very fast indeed.
By the end of the day, the sun was beginning to set in a beautiful fashion as the WWII Lancaster and Spitfires circled the skies and the track action began to wind down. As we left, we soon realised that the Revival doesn’t end there, either. The car park for starters is divided into the general parking areas and the pre-’66 area – in either, though, there’s a feast of classic motors on display as far as the eye can see.
Heading back on to Sussex’s roads, we were soon greeted by countless waves, cheers, and knowing nods – I had the privilege of sharing the driving home in a good friend’s tuned ’68 Triumph Herald, which I cherished – the amount of attention all classics get in the traffic, whether a priceless E-type Jag or a slightly snotty Herald, is terrific.
Home was welcome by the time we got back there – the Revival is a tiring place to go, but simply epic. It almost seemed saddening to go back to wearing skinny jeans and a hoodie the next day – I think I left a part of me at Goodwood. Stepping back into the past, to the world of period racing is just like nothing else – and nothing in the world can match Goodwood.


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